Beyond The Meme: Burger King Merger Facts

1) Burger King is a Brazilian-owned company and has been since 2010.
2) Burger King was a British-owned company from 1989-2002.
3) Burger King has always been headquartered in Florida.
4) Burger King is not moving its headquarters from Florida.
5) Burger King restaurants are 99% franchisee-owned.
6) Burger King franchisees will still pay taxes based on where their businesses are located and/or the owners reside.
7) Burger King pays significantly less in taxes than the average U.S. corporation because it has a history of aggressively pursuing taxpayer-funded “subsidies” from various governments.
8) Burger King stated that its current tax burden is not as worrisome as the potential that it might be forced to pay closer to (but still lower than) the average U.S. corporation (i.e., if rent seeking becomes less successful).
9) Burger King is getting tons of free advertising by making conservatives think it is leaving the U.S. because of our high corporate tax rate when it’s not actually moving but simply merging with a Canadian company and setting up the headquarters of the new parent company in Canada, probably because Canada’s crazy laws “protecting Canadian culture” make the merger easier if the parent company is based in Canada (that’s just my hunch at this point).
10) Burger King and Tim Hortons will still be owned by the Brazilian capital firm, 3G, that currently owns a 71% stake in Burger King.
11) None of this matters at all because the bigger issue is that tax rates are not predictable from year-to-year, our current system is a mess of subsidies, credits, penalties, etc. that vary thoughout every corrupt locality in America, making long-term business planning incredibly difficult, and there isn’t even an definitive U.S. corporate tax rate that you can accurately cite because there are so many ways that politicians across the country can grant rent seeking requests to pick winners and losers. We need to reform the tax code and move to something closer to a flat tax because other companies should not be forced to waste so much effort pursuing taxpayer-funded subsidies as Burger King.

bigboppa01:

Mint Shelby Mustang

bigboppa01:

Mint Shelby Mustang

communismkills:

basedskeleton:

communismkills:

communismkills:

DontTreadOnVirginia made this for me.

This image just got liked so I am reblogging it.


The flag is waving the wrong way that’s disrespectful.

Slow down dude. I didn’t put the flag in the original photo.

… It was based on an actual photo of a guy holding a shotgun and a flag in the winds of a hurricane.  This idiot’s beef is with the wind in a hurricane.  Has this idiot actually seen a flag flying on a flagpole before?  Flags change direction with the direction of the wind.  That’s how flags work.

communismkills:

basedskeleton:

communismkills:

communismkills:

DontTreadOnVirginia made this for me.

This image just got liked so I am reblogging it.

The flag is waving the wrong way that’s disrespectful.

Slow down dude. I didn’t put the flag in the original photo.

… It was based on an actual photo of a guy holding a shotgun and a flag in the winds of a hurricane. This idiot’s beef is with the wind in a hurricane. Has this idiot actually seen a flag flying on a flagpole before? Flags change direction with the direction of the wind. That’s how flags work.

communismkills:

I never understand why people care more about the messenger than the message, to the point that they’ll be intellectually dishonest and inconsistent in order to avoid agreeing with a particular person.

OMG I CAN’T AGREE WITH ANN COULTER OR BILL O’REILLY EWWWWW even though we agree on most things, but I hate them irrationally.

The original source of a quote or an idea is often extremely important because nothing occurs in a vacuum. When somebody quotes a brutal maniac on government corruption from his defense at the Nuremberg Trials or any thug taken out of the context of the entire rest of his or her life, it is intellectually dishonest. Quoting a person is a means of conferring legitimacy to him or her as a person and the larger body of his or her work from which that quote originated. No quote completely stands alone. All quotes have biases and agendas associated with them.

It is often the case that a person may disagree with a quote simply because the person responsible for that quote is somebody who has a different agenda than the person attacking the quote. Often, people attack quotes in a dishonest manner because they have no valid counterargument against the quote and result to ad hominem attacks. This is an entirely different scenario. It is, however, not technically irrational because such people often believe that ad hominem attacks are the best way to advance their agendas. Sadly, we know that it often works and people actually do respond to such immature behavior. It’s dishonest and vile but not technically irrational.

If you legitimately believe that a person is trying to advance a sinister agenda, any quote that seems benign could be seen as being taken out of the context of a larger sinister agenda and is therefore sinister. Quoting someone, especially a deceased person, is itself a form of honoring that person. If you believe that a person advanced a vile agenda, quoting that person is a form of honoring him or her and that vile agenda. In Judaism, we write YM”SH, Y’Sh, or Y”ShU next to the names of vile people who tried to wipe us out. These translate to: “May his name be wiped out (YH”SH, Y’Sh); May his name and memory be wiped out (Y’Shu).” Saying or writing a deceased person’s name is a means of honoring that person because it preserves the memory of that person in the world of the living and that works to preserve their memory in the world of the dead. Names are extremely important.

All of this concerns people at least somewhat of capable engaging in legitimate discourse. There are also children who whine about this and that because that are not intelligent enough to advance any form of an argument. These immature individuals shouldn’t even be acknowledged so as to prevent legitimizing their behavior.

imagemrsrandallboggs replied to your post:spydrz replied to your video:”Heartland” by U2 See…

Totally going off on a tangent, here, but why is it weird that you were 11 and in sixth grade when middle school began? Is that not normal for Virginia?

I was referring to the fact that spydrz said he was 11 when he received Rattle and Hum as a gift.  I remembered my story was in middle school but I’m not sure if it was sixth or seventh grade but middle school started when I was 11 so that was the interesting part.

Actually, in some counties in Virginia, middle school does not begin until seventh grade.  Fairfax County does it this way and I think it is ridiculous that they think kids need to be babied in a classroom with a single teacher for an extra year instead of starting middle school in sixth grade and learning to navigate schedules, classrooms, bells, and changing periods when they are 11.  It also seems ridiculous to only have kids attend middle school for two years (7-8) between seven years in elementary school (K-6) and four years in high school (9-12).  That’s a really short period of time to send kids to a single school before moving them to another school.

Does any body else remember these from the mid-1990s?  This company sold bubble gum discs in real CD jewel cases with hilarious case liners based on real albums but with the names changed to be bubble gum themed.  It was around the time when the Discman replaced the Walkman as the cool music player to own and CDs became the “it” thing.

imagespydrz replied to your video:"Heartland" by U2 See the sunrise over her skin…

First CD I got as a gift, when it was a new album. Didn’t appreciate it immediately…but I was only 11.

I’m not sure exactly which U2 album was the first I owned myself.  I listened to my dad’s CD of The Joshua Tree over and over again starting in middle school (interestingly, I was 11 in sixth grade when middle school began).  It really got me through some rough times when my parents were getting divorced and the period of time before they separated when things were rough because of all the arguments.  I stayed up a few nights with my Sony CD boombox set up on the carpet in the middle of the living room floor lying in front of it listening to that album the entire night a few times.  My mom initially shouted at me to turn off the music, go back to my room, and go to sleep but I kept refusing.  It wasn’t long before she realized I was going through a rough time and that staying up listening to that CD was helping more than it was hurting so it was probably okay every so often.  I still have that CD that was originally my dad’s copy.   However, I got too many scratches on it and had to replace it.  The label on that CD looks completely different than later copies.  My dad bought a CD player in the mid-1980s for around $600 so it was probably one of the first CD issues of that album.  There was a mastering issue with some of the earlier copies where the track did not break at the right position so there have been a few different issues of the exact same CD.  The Joshua Tree has been my favorite album for at least two decades now.

I really love the Rattle and Hum album and movie as well.  I’ve owned the album since the mid-late-1990s and the DVD of the movie since the early 2000s.  It was one of the first DVDs I bought when I bought a DVD-ROM drive for the desktop computer I built before I even had a DVD player for the TV.  I love the song “Heartland” because I love driving through rural mountains and farms.  I got my learner’s permit when I was 15 and once I had mastered driving around the parking lot at my high school with my mom in her 1994 Ford Crown Victoria and local driving, I used to drive on VA-7 to Winchester in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia (about 50 miles each way) with her in the passenger’s seat to practice longer trips.  I’ve always loved that type of driving and that U2 song evokes images of driving through the heartland of America.  It’s not exactly the same type of terrain, but I love the imagery of the song because of lines such as:

Sixty-six - a highway speaks
Of deserts dry
Of cool green valleys
Gold and silver veins
All the shining cities
In this heartland
In this heartland
In this heartland.
Heaven knows
This is a heartland.
Heartland, our heartland.

See the sunrise over her skin
She feels like water in my hand
Freeway, like a river
Cuts through this land
Into the side of love

There are definitely plenty of cool green valleys in that part of Virginia.  Most of the road trips we took when I was a child were to Morgantown, West Virginia to visit my grandma.  The majority of those trips were before I-68 opened.  The trips on US-40, US-50, and US-522 were always a bit of an adventure.  When I-68 opened, they had an exhibit at Sideling Hill in Maryland where the freeway was cut through the side of the mountain, exposing geologic formations in a manner that is really unlike any similar road cut anywhere else in the world.  I’ve always loved driving through mountains, rural communities, and all of the weird roadside Americana like Dinosaur Land, a place I know you have visited.

On one of those trips to Winchester, my mom and I went to the visitor’s center for Frederick County.  They had a Patsy Cline exhibit because she was born and raised in Frederick County, Virginia.  They opened the house in Winchester where she lived longer than anywhere else in Virginia or Tennessee as a museum in 2011.  I have not been there yet but they had a campaign before the museum opened to raise money by selling commemorative bricks for the walkway.  My mom bought a brick for a similar campaign in the 1990s at that visitor’s center for significantly less than the price of the bricks in the campaign that ended in 2011.  It will be interesting to see if they ever did anything with the bricks from that original campaign or if that group went defunct and a new group took over.  They’ve been trying to build a museum for decades.  We don’t really have any records or anything so I have no idea what happened.

"Heartland" by U2

See the sunrise over her skin
Don’t change it.
See the sunrise over her skin
Dawn changes everything, everything.
And the delta sun
Burns bright and violent.

Mississippi and the cotton wool heat
Sixty-six - a highway speaks
Of deserts dry
Of cool green valleys
Gold and silver veins
All the shining cities
In this heartland
In this heartland
In this heartland.
Heaven knows
This is a heartland.
Heartland, our heartland.

See the sunrise over her skin
She feels like water in my hand
Freeway, like a river
Cuts through this land
Into the side of love
Like a burning spear
And the poison rain
Like dirty tears
Through the ghostranch hills
Death Valley waters
In the towers of steel
Belief goes on and on
In this heartland
In this heartland
In this heartland
Heaven knows
This is a heartland.